Preview of Opałka’s Party Crasher

A teaser for the new electroacoustic work by Tomasz Jakub Opałka, entitled Party Crasher, is now up online. It features performances on the cello by Magdalena Bojanowicz-Koziak and the composer on synths, percussion, and trombone. Headphones or a good sound system are recommended for listening, because of the very interesting and loud low frequencies in the piece. The preview for this new work is on www.youtube.com.

Tomasz Jakub Opałka (born 1983, Poland) is considered as one of the most original composers of his generation, and yet one of the few young artists with such extensive experience in writing orchestral music. After completing studies at The Chopin University of Music in Warsaw/Poland, he went to Los Angeles, where he gained experience in film music, cooperating with some of the top Hollywood composers. He is an author of several film scores, presenting a distinct and original voice. His artistic attitude gives vibrant results. He is focused on film projects where music can be heard and is treated as an important part of the project. In classical music, he quickly established his name working with the most important orchestras and soloists in Poland and abroad, such as: Arditi Quartet, Janusz Wawrowski, Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra, Warsaw Philharmonic, etc. His works have been commissioned by renowned ensembles throughout the world, including: the Polish Royal Opera, Deutsche Oper Berlin, Calgary Philharmonic, the New Music Orchestra, and many more. His music has been performed in the US, Mexico, South Korea, Germany, Slovakia, China, Lithuania, Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, and others. Opałka is also an experienced music producer, working with diverse electronic tools and virtual instruments. He teaches film music composition and orchestration at the Chopin University of Music in Warsaw, and is considered as an expert in this field in his native country.

“[Opałka’s] ‘Emerge’ also appropriately signals the arrival of an exciting new voice in contemporary music.”- The Gramophone